How to make a water volcano đźŚ‹

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Being able to do this activity is all about having the right size and shaped containers. Having said that, our small jar was far from perfect, right size but the shape was a little off! A small jar with a narrower neck or a very small bottle would have been more effective.

For this volcano, you will need a large glass jar, a smaller glass bottle, wire, red food colouring and hot and cold water. Tie some wire around the small glass bottle so that it can be picked up without having to hold the glass.

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Pour cold water into the large glass jar so it’s about 2/3 full. Fill the small glass jar with hot water and add a teaspoon red food colouring. Z went a bit over the top with the food colouring as she poured it in!

img_6094Carefully place the small jar into the large jar and watch the water volcano erupt. This happens super quickly so you (or the children) may want to do this a few times. This volcano shows how cold and warm water mix. The hot water expands, taking up more space. It is, therefore, lighter than cold water and rises to the surface.

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We found this activity in My First Science Book it’s full of 23 really simple, doable science experiments that can easily be done at home. Well worth getting for any young science enthusiasts.

Have you done any volcano experiments? I’d love to hear about them. Please comment below.

Thanks for reading

Sarah 🙂

*This post includes affiliate links (see disclaimer)

 

First hand experiences – Butterflies

M was delighted when these tiny caterpillars arrived at the door as an early birthday present. They really were itty bitty tiny. Crazy to think that in just a few weeks they would be fully fledged Painted Lady Butterflies. I wanted to record our experience so I took photographs most days. From receiving the caterpillars till they turned in to chrysalis took just 13 days. Unfortunately one little caterpillar (he was definitely the runt of the group) never made it this far.

Our caterpillars came from Insect Lore. They guarantee that at least 3 of the caterpillars will become butterflies. If they don’t they will send you more. We started off with 5 caterpillars, one died before changing into a chrysalis. One chrysalis was on the bottom of the tub and never became a butterfly. Thankfully 3 became butterflies.

It took another 12 days before the first butterfly emerged. We received the caterpillars at the end of August when it was feeling cooler. I am wondering if we’d had them earlier in the year that we’d have had more success, as in 5 butterflies.

Unfortunetly we went on holiday (really not unfortunately!) and we didn’t see the last two butterflies emerge. Our friends looked after our butterflies and we had the pleasure of setting them free when we returned. We loved having these wild creatures resting in our hands before flying away.

There’s no better way to learn about the life cycle of a butterfly than to watch it first hand. It has been a truly delightful experience, one we will definitely be repeating next year.

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Have you ever experienced anything like this? I’d love to hear about it. Please comment below.

Sarah 🙂

How to make Geodes

We have this lovely book all about rocks. A rock is lively by Diana Hutts Aston. It’s all about the ingredients that make up rocks. It has some beautiful pictures in it, in an attempt to recreate some of this beauty we made some Geodes. Geodes are rocks with sparkling crystals inside them.

We made our geodes by slightly heating up some water and dissolving as much salt as possible.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe mixed the salt solution with food colouring inside some egg shells and left them. It took many days for our geodes to develop

The best geodes that we created were the egg shells in pots that started off with the most salt solution in.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe loved how the molecular structure of the salt changed and in some instances created what looked like perfect squares.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe’d love you to share with us about any fab science experiments you’ve done, please comment below. 🙂

When Okido meets Skittles

 I love our Okido Magazine that pops through the door every month. I shouldn’t really say I love it as it’s aimed at 3-8 year olds, but I do! And so does our son (who definitely does fall in correct age bracket).

This months magazine had a fabulous experiment that our children really wanted to try. We got together some skittles, a plate, a bowl and a jug of water.

After arranging the skittles around the upturned bowl, we removed the bowl and poured a small amount of water in the middle of the circle.img_0934We then watched and enjoyed the colour from the skittles dissolving in the water creating this beautiful pattern. It was fun to watch the colours mixing and inevitably turning into a brown mushy colour!

We were interested to see that when we turned over the skittles there were small dots of colour where the skittles were resting on the plate and the water didn’t come into contact with the skittle and therefore the colour didn’t dissolve away.

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Nice one OKIDO!

Whats your favourite kids magazine?

 

Science School – Magic Ice

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We picked up a new book from the library entitled Science School by Mick Manning and Brita Granstrom. The book is full of science experiments that can be done at home. So here’s our first one…Magic Ice.

Could we get an ice cube out of a glass of water without getting wet?

We were allowed some string and some salt!!

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Here’s how we got on. With our ice in the glass, Penguin lay the string on the ice and sprinkled some salt over. We waited for about a minute.

The salt caused the ice to melt a little, the water seeped into the string and the ice caused it to re-freeze and then we could pick up the string and the ice was attached. No wet hands!

Penguin then went in to pick up much more ice with his string. I could tell he was having fun!

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Have you done any science experiments at home that worked really well?

This post is linked with
Monkey and Mouse