Chromatography Experiment

In really simple terms Chromatography is a method of separating a mixture of chemicals. M and Z were interested to see what colours were in the ink of different coloured pens. They drew dots of different coloured ink on blotting paper about an inch from the bottom of the paper.

Next, they placed the blotting paper in a jar with about a cm of water in. The paper soaked up the ink and the colours separated.

We initially tried this experiment with Sharpie’s (permanent markers), these inks didn’t separate easily so we tried regular felt tips and achieved better results.

The purple, brown and grey felt tips pens produced interesting results. Have a go and see what colours you see…

In this photograph, you can see the difference between using sharpies and using regular felt tip pens.

Thanks for reading. 🙂

 

How to make a water volcano 🌋

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Being able to do this activity is all about having the right size and shaped containers. Having said that, our small jar was far from perfect, right size but the shape was a little off! A small jar with a narrower neck or a very small bottle would have been more effective.

For this volcano, you will need a large glass jar, a smaller glass bottle, wire, red food colouring and hot and cold water. Tie some wire around the small glass bottle so that it can be picked up without having to hold the glass.

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Pour cold water into the large glass jar so it’s about 2/3 full. Fill the small glass jar with hot water and add a teaspoon red food colouring. Z went a bit over the top with the food colouring as she poured it in!

img_6094Carefully place the small jar into the large jar and watch the water volcano erupt. This happens super quickly so you (or the children) may want to do this a few times. This volcano shows how cold and warm water mix. The hot water expands, taking up more space. It is, therefore, lighter than cold water and rises to the surface.

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We found this activity in My First Science Book it’s full of 23 really simple, doable science experiments that can easily be done at home. Well worth getting for any young science enthusiasts.

Have you done any volcano experiments? I’d love to hear about them. Please comment below.

Thanks for reading

Sarah 🙂

*This post includes affiliate links (see disclaimer)

 

How to make Geodes

We have this lovely book all about rocks. A rock is lively by Diana Hutts Aston. It’s all about the ingredients that make up rocks. It has some beautiful pictures in it, in an attempt to recreate some of this beauty we made some Geodes. Geodes are rocks with sparkling crystals inside them.

We made our geodes by slightly heating up some water and dissolving as much salt as possible.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe mixed the salt solution with food colouring inside some egg shells and left them. It took many days for our geodes to develop

The best geodes that we created were the egg shells in pots that started off with the most salt solution in.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe loved how the molecular structure of the salt changed and in some instances created what looked like perfect squares.

Processed with VSCO with s1 presetWe’d love you to share with us about any fab science experiments you’ve done, please comment below. 🙂

When Okido meets Skittles

 I love our Okido Magazine that pops through the door every month. I shouldn’t really say I love it as it’s aimed at 3-8 year olds, but I do! And so does our son (who definitely does fall in correct age bracket).

This months magazine had a fabulous experiment that our children really wanted to try. We got together some skittles, a plate, a bowl and a jug of water.

After arranging the skittles around the upturned bowl, we removed the bowl and poured a small amount of water in the middle of the circle.img_0934We then watched and enjoyed the colour from the skittles dissolving in the water creating this beautiful pattern. It was fun to watch the colours mixing and inevitably turning into a brown mushy colour!

We were interested to see that when we turned over the skittles there were small dots of colour where the skittles were resting on the plate and the water didn’t come into contact with the skittle and therefore the colour didn’t dissolve away.

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Nice one OKIDO!

Whats your favourite kids magazine?

 

Look I made a Magnet!

We have a bunch of different magnets in the house but on the whole none that were super powerful. They weren’t strong enough to do the experiments that we wanted to do.

So, we bought some really strong magnets. Now these magnets are definitely not the type to leave around the house for little people to play with at will!! There would be disastorous concequences of non-functioning phones and kurput electrical equipment. So, beware if you decide to do this at home! The packaging was full of strong warnings!

We used these super strong magnets to make…..another magnet!

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Little Man stroked a large needle a few times with one side of the magnet and hey presto….the needle became magnetic. The amazing thing was that the magnet stayed magnetic for ages! I though maybe it would be magnetic for a few minutes and we’d have to go through the process again. However, the needle picked up the paper clips and even they became magnetic, I found them sticking to some electrical devise the next day!!

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We also used the magnetic needle to create a compass. We laid the needle on some cardboard which we placed in a bowl of water and hey presto. We spun the card around and it would always settle with the needle pointing north! How very cool.

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Have you done any magnetic experiments? Did you get the results you imagined?